Brown Vs. Board Of Education

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Brown Vs. Board Of Education. By Randy B. In the early 1950's, racial segregation in public schools was the norm across America. Although all the schools in a given district were supposed to be equal, most black schools were far inferior to their white counterparts. How It Was. Linda Brown.
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Brown Vs. Board Of EducationBy Randy BIn the early 1950's, racial segregation in public schools was the norm across America. Although all the schools in a given district were supposed to be equal, most black schools were far inferior to their white counterparts.How It WasLinda Brown
  • A black third-grader named Linda brown lived only a few blocks from a school but that school was a white school so she had to walk one mile to the nearest black school and this was supposedly separate but equal.
  • What She Went Through
  • Linda Brown had to walk one mile through a railroad switchyard to get to her black elementary school, even though a white elementary school was only seven blocks away.
  • Linda's father, Oliver Brown, tried to enroll her in the white elementary school, but the principal of the school refused.
  • Linda Going to schoolLinda Brown and Her Sister Walking to School (1953) by Carl Iwasaki (Modern Print). Sisters Linda and Terry Brown were not allowed to attend nearby all-white New Summer School in Topeka, Kansas, but had to walk through the dangerous Rock Island switchyard to catch a bus for the all-black Monroe School. On May 17, 1954, in Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the separate-but-equal doctrine, ending the legal basis for segregation of public schools. Someone Cares
  • The NAACP took up her case, along with similar ones in Kansas, South Carolina, Virginia, and Delaware. All five cases were argued together in December, 1952 by Thurgood Marshall, a black lawyer who headed the NAACP.
  • Some examplesThe Decision
  • Supreme Court Decision
  • Related Search
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