Grade 4: Module 4: Unit 2: Lesson 10 Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow

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Grade 4: Module 4: Unit 2: Lesson 10 Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
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Grade 4: Module 4: Unit 2: Lesson 10 Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license. Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS) I can summarize a story, drama, or poem. (RL.4.2) I can describe a story s characters, setting, or events using specific details from the text. (RL.4.3) I can choose evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.4.9) I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about fourth-grade topics and texts. (SL.4.1) Supporting Learning Targets I can write a focus statement supported by evidence from the text for my essay about Myrtle. I can write a short essay that describes the experience of Myrtle s ride in the colored car in The Hope Chest. Ongoing Assessment Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (from homework) Short Essay about the Character Myrtle in The Hope Chest Text-dependent questions for Brainstorm Carousel Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Agenda 1. Opening A. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes) B. Sharing Homework and Engaging the Reader (8 minutes) 2. Work Time A. Writing a Focus Statement Supported by Evidence (15 minutes) B. Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle (25 minutes) 3. Closing and Assessment A. Sharing Essays: Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol (10 minutes) 4. Homework A. Read Chapter 10 and complete notes on the Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 10: Red and Yellow Roses to prepare for tomorrow s assessment. Teaching Notes In this lesson, students will plan and write their essay, with support, in one sitting. This lesson is designed to build writing stamina so that students are able to write to prompts that require an extended response in a single sitting later in this unit, including the mid-unit assessment. It will also help prepare students for future on-demand assessments that require extended written responses. In advance: Read carefully the modeling described in Work Time A; review the Back-to-Back and Faceto-Face and Brainstorm Carousel protocols (see Appendix). Post: Learning targets. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Lesson Vocabulary structure, reacted, introduction, body, conclusion Materials Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (Answers, for Teacher Reference). Equity sticks Violet s Character anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3) Other Characters Actions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8) Structure of a Short Essay anchor chart (begun in Lesson 9) Essay Prompt/Planner (from Lesson 8; one per student and one to display) Document camera Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 10: Red and Yellow Roses (one per student) Opening Meeting Students Needs A. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes) Ask students to read the learning targets silently as you read them aloud: * I can write a focus statement supported by evidence from the text for my essay about Myrtle. * I can write a short essay that describes the experience of Myrtle s ride in the colored car in The Hope Chest. * I can discuss how different characters reacted to Myrtle having to ride in the Jim Crow car. Tell students that today they will learn how to write a focus statement for their essays, then plan and write their essays about Myrtle. Ask students to give a thumbs-up, thumbs-sideways, or thumbs-down to check for understanding of the targets, with a thumbs-down for no understanding, thumbs-sideways If you have a group of students who struggle with writing or planning their writing, consider pulling a small group for additional support for Step 5 on the Essay Prompt/Planner. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Opening (continued) B. Sharing Homework and Engaging the Reader (8 minutes) Ask students to get out their Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (from homework). Tell them that today they will share their homework using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Review the steps with students, and then start the protocol: 1. Stand back-to-back with a partner. Think about what you will share. 2. When the teacher says, Face-to-Face, turn to face your partner. 3. Pick someone to go first, then take turns sharing. Meeting Students Needs Use of protocols (like Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face) allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students practice their speaking and listening skills. Once students have shared, use equity sticks to cold call a few to share their summaries. Listen for them to identify each portion of the Somebody Wanted But So Then strategy in their summaries for this chapter. Refer to the Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (Answers, for Teacher Reference). Post the Violet s Character anchor chart and Other Characters Action anchor chart. Ask students for suggested additions to the charts. Be sure the following is added: Violet: Action: She warns Mr. Martin that there are agents coming to arrest him (page 103). What this says about this character: She trusts her instincts. Others: Miss Dexter Action: She says segregation is a distraction from women s suffrage (page 98). What this says about her character: She is narrow-minded or prejudiced. Others: Miss Kelley Action: She tells Violet that whites can stand side-by-side with blacks against Jim Crow laws (page 111). What this says about her character: She is accepting and willing to work with others for what is right. Collect students summaries from this chapter for a formative assessment of RL.4.2. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Work Time Meeting Students Needs A. Writing a Focus Statement Supported by Evidence (15 minutes) Tell students that today you are going to give them an extended time to write their essays. Explain that being able to sit down for an extended time and write in response to a question is a skill that they will need in school, in college, and as adults in their career. Post the Structure of a Short Essay anchor chart (from Lesson 9). Review each part of the essay and its purpose. Encourage students to use the colors to help them remember the purpose of each part: The introduction is red because it helps to catch the reader s attention and gives them background information on the topic. The focus statement, the main idea of the essay, is green because it is supported by the evidence in the body (blue and yellow). The conclusion is a synthesis of the evidence in the body paragraph and restates the focus, so it is also green. Tell students that their next step is to finish planning and then write their essays. On the bottom of the Structure of a Short Essay anchor chart, add and explain these writing tips: * Read the prompt carefully and annotate or rewrite it in your own words. Do you understand the prompt? * Check your essay plan against the prompt before you start writing. Did you include everything that the prompt requires? Explain that it is very important to understand the prompt thoroughly and to use it to check yourself during the writing process. Remind students that they have already discussed the meaning of the prompt in Lessons 8 and 9, but today they will have a chance to check their planning against the prompt and reread their finished essays and check these against the prompt as well. Tell students that before they begin, you would like to model how to write a focus statement. Display Step 4 of the Essay Prompt/Planner using a document camera. Model using a think-aloud to show students how to examine the evidence they have collected to write a focus statement. Read the evidence you have on your displayed planner and think aloud: * So when I was reading Chapter 8, I noticed that people did a lot of mean things to Myrtle as she walked back to ride in the Jim Crow car. Point out this recorded evidence: Myrtle was laughed at when she fell (page 91), and the conductor shoves Myrtle and she can t open the door and begins to cry (page 92). * But I also noticed that she was strong, because she did not show people she was angry and she refused to give up hope on being able to vote in the future. Point out this recorded evidence: Myrtle refuses to show people she is angry that they are laughing (page 91), and she tells the old woman she sits next to that she will vote when she grows up (page 97). Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Work Time (continued) Meeting Students Needs Turn your planner over to Step 5 and remind students that the focus statement should answer the prompt: How did riding in the Jim Crow car affect Myrtle? * Based on this evidence, I think Myrtle was upset by the experience but was able to remain strong. So I think my focus statement will be: Myrtle was upset by having to ride in the Jim Crow car, but she remained strong anyway. Record this focus statement on your planner. Show students where they should record the evidence that supports their focus statement in the Body box. Reread the prompt for students and demonstrate checking your focus statement to see that it fully answers the prompt. Ask students to restate the steps you took to write your focus statement. Distribute students Essay Prompt/Planner (taken up for assessment in Lesson 9) and ask them to get together with their triads. Give students 5 minutes to write their own focus statements and select the evidence they will use in the body of their essays. Circulate to support students. It is likely that they will have similar focus statements. This is acceptable and appropriate, as they are basing their work on the model and drawing from the same pool of evidence. On the mid-unit assessment and later in the unit, students will take on more responsibility for creating their focus statements independently. Ask for a few volunteers to share their focus statements and evidence. Be sure to point out how these examples answer the prompt and are supported by evidence from the text. B. Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle (25 minutes) Tell students that they will have 30 minutes to plan and write their essays and that they should use the Writing a Short Essay anchor chart to help guide them. Release students to continue planning and writing their essays independently. Circulate and support them in checking their plans against the prompt before they begin to write their essays. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Writing a Short Essay about Myrtle and Discussing Character Reactions to Jim Crow Closing and Assessment Meeting Students Needs A. Sharing Essays: Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol (10 minutes) Gather students for another round of Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face to share their writing. Ask them to bring their finished essay and get back with their partner from the beginning of the lesson. Once students are back-to-back with their partners, ask them to reread their own essay silently and think about: * Which part of your essay are you most proud of the introduction, focus statement and evidence, or conclusion? Why? Give students a few minutes to reread and think about their response. Next, explain that when you give the signal, they will turn face-to-face to take turns reading their essay to their partners. They should also share which part of the essay they are most proud of and why. Collect students essays to give feedback on their focus statements and use of evidence. Students will read this feedback before taking their mid-unit assessment. Distribute the Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 10: Red and Yellow Roses for homework. Explain that this homework will help them to prepare for an on-demand assessment of their ability to infer about characters and events in Chapter 10. Point out that there is no section for a summary statement in this Reader s Guide, because they will write a summary during tomorrow s assessment. Homework Meeting Students Needs Read Chapter 10 and complete notes on the Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 10: Red and Yellow Roses to prepare for tomorrow s assessment. Reread as you take notes. Note: Give feedback to students on their essays from today s lesson. Target your feedback to the focus statement and use of evidence only. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Grade 4: Module 4: Unit 2: Lesson 10 Supporting Materials This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Exempt third-party content is indicated by the footer: (name of copyright holder). Used by permission and not subject to Creative Commons license. Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (Answers, For Teacher Reference) Historical Background Information Palmer Agents: government agents who later became the Federal Bureau of Investigation, or FBI. These agents investigated and arrested people who were considered traitors for speaking against World War I and the U.S. government. Florence Kelly: worked to stop child labor, get women the right to vote, and protect the civil rights of African Americans. She was a founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, or NAACP. NAACP: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was formed in 1909 to help protect the rights of all people and end racial discrimination (treating others unfairly). Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (Answers, For Teacher Reference) Glossary conceal (108): synonym: hide antonym: show disadvantages (99): isn t helpful Figurative and Complex Language: Idioms and Adages send someone to the rightabout (100): to turn someone away get fresh (100): to be rude inequality (99): not equal; not the same as racialist (98): someone who is a racist or believes that one race is better than others gentleman friend (101): boyfriend beyond the pale (103): unacceptable or improper radicals (110): people in favor of extreme changes in government or society smitten (100): struck by strong feelings of love socialist (109): a person who believes that most resources and property should be shared by the community to increase economic equality traitor (107): a person who is disloyal to or betrays his own country vacated (102): left empty Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Reader s Guide for The Hope Chest, Chapter 9: Mr. Martin s Escape (Answers, For Teacher Reference) Summary Notes: Somebody: Violet In: the train heading to Tennessee Wanted: to bring Myrtle food But: When she got back to the suffragists train car, there were federal agents looking for Mr. Martin, saying he was a Bolshevist and against the United States. Summary: Violet is with the rest of the suffragists on a train heading to Nashville, but Myrtle had to ride with the other colored people in the last train car. When Violet got back from taking Myrtle food, there were federal agents in the suffragists car looking for Mr. Martin. They said he was a Bolshevist and was against the United States. Violet was able to warn him about the agents, so he escaped by jumping off the train. The agents were very angry and told the suffragists that they could get into a lot of trouble for helping him. So: Violet warned him that they were looking for him so he could jump off the train and get away. Then: The agents warned the suffragists that they could get in trouble if they protected him. They didn t care. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Bolded type indicates additions made in this lesson. Violet s Character Anchor Chart (For Teacher Reference) Character Actions that affect others What does this say about this character? Violet 1. She stood up to her parents (pages 1 4). 2. She made quilt squares for French orphans (pages 9 and 10). 3. She ran away from home (pages 18 and 19). 4. She gave money to the brakeman to free Myrtle (page 58). 5. She holds Myrtle s hand when she is told to ride in the colored car but doesn t say anything (page 87). 6. She warns Mr. Martin that there are agents coming to arrest him (page 103). 1. She is a strong-willed girl. 7. She is compassionate and wants to help others. 8. She is unhappy enough to leave home and not care that her parents might worry. 9. She is generous and protective of her friends. 10. She cares for her friends but is used to following the rules. 11. She trusts her instincts. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Others Character Anchor Chart (For Teacher Reference) Bolded type indicates additions made in this lesson. Be sure to save room for additions to Mr. Martin s section of this anchor chart. Character Actions that affect others What does this say about this character? Mr. Martin 1. He made Violet send her parents a telegram saying that she was OK (page 78). 2. He joined the Children s Crusade (page 81). 3. He stands up for Myrtle when she is told to ride in the colored car (page 87). 1. He feels responsible for others. 2. He is adventurous and believes that actions make a difference. 3. He stands up for what he thinks is right and defends others against injustice. Miss Dexter 1. She says segregation is a distraction from women s suffrage (page 98). 1. She is narrow-minded or prejudiced. Miss Kelley 1. She tells Violet that whites can stand side-byside with blacks against Jim Crow laws (page 111). 1. She is accepting and willing to work with others for what is right. Copyright 2013 by Expeditionary Learning, New York, NY. All Rights Reserved. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G4:M4:U2:L10 June Short Essay Prompt/Planner (For Teacher Reference) How did riding in the Jim Crow car ( colored car ) affect Myrtle? After reading Chapter 8, write a short essay answering the question above. Use at least two details from the text to support your answer. Step 1 Read The Hope Chest, Chapter 8: In the Jim Crow Car and summarize it in your Reader s Guide. Step 2 Reread the text and use evidence flags to mark details that describe Myrtle s thoughts, feelings, or what happened to her as a result of riding in the Jim Crow car. Step 3 Talk with your reading triad. Share your thoughts on how Myrtle was affected by riding in the Jim Crow car. Share your evidence. Step 4 Review your evidence flags in Chapter 8 and record four details from the text that describe how Myrtle was
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