Questionnaire for the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, covering the period

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Division of Policy Analysis and Public Affairs United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Questionnaire for the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, covering
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Division of Policy Analysis and Public Affairs United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Questionnaire for the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, covering the period Country name: The officer responsible for coordinating the collection of the data for the entire questionnaire should return all sections of the completed questionnaire no later than 31 January 2006 to the Division of Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, P.O. Box 500, A-1400, Vienna, Austria, or to the Statistics Division, United Nations, New York, N.Y , United States of America. This questionnaire is being distributed through the Permanent Missions to the United Nations. In order to facilitate any clarification of the data provided, information about the coordinating officer should be given below and on the first page of each of the sections of the questionnaire. Coordinating officer s name: Functional title: Agency: Street: City/state/country: Telephone (including country code and city code): Fax (including country code and city code): Contents Introduction... 3 A. Objectives of the Ninth Survey... 3 B. Instructions for completing the questionnaire... 3 I. Police... 4 Table 1. Police personnel, by sex, and financial resources Crimes recorded in criminal (police) statistics, by type of crime including attempts to commit crimes Persons brought into initial formal contact with the police and/or the criminal justice system, by type of crime, where initial formal contact might include being suspected, arrested, cautioned, etc Persons brought into formal contact with the criminal justice system, by sex and age group, where formal contact might include being suspected, arrested, cautioned, etc II. Prosecution Table 5. Prosecution personnel, by sex, and financial resources Persons prosecuted, by type of crime Persons prosecuted, by sex and age group Page III. Courts Table 8. Judges, by status and sex, and financial resources, including in appeal courts Persons brought before the criminal courts Persons convicted in the criminal courts, by type of crime Persons convicted in the criminal courts, by sex and age group IV. Prisons/penal institutions Table 12. Adult prisons, penal institutions or correctional institutions Juvenile prisons, penal institutions or correctional institutions Staff of adult or juvenile prisons, penal institutions or correctional institutions, by sex, and financial resources Persons incarcerated, by category of incarceration, selected day Convicted prisoners, by sex and age group, selected day Adult prisoners: Average length of time time actually served in prison, after conviction, by offenses Persons on probation, by age group, selected day Persons on conditional release / parole, by age group, selected day Indicative percentage of prisoners suffering from Annex FORM FOR THE SURVEY OF NATIONAL CAPACITIES Introduction A. Objectives of the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems 1. The Economic and Social Council, in its resolution 1984/48 of 25 May 1984, requested the Secretary- General to maintain and develop the United Nations crime-related database by continuing to conduct surveys of crime trends and operations of criminal justice systems. 2. The main goal of the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, covering the period , is to collect data on the incidence of reported crime and the operations of criminal justice systems with a view to improving the analysis and dissemination of that information throughout the world. The results of the Ninth Survey will provide an overview of crime trends and relationships between various parts of the criminal justice system and promote informed decisionmaking in administration, at the national and international levels. 3. The data gathered by the Ninth Survey, as is the case in each of the previous sweeps of the survey, is critical in providing insights into overall global crime and crime justice trends. The data builds on that already collected, providing a unique insight into global crime trends since the mid-1970s. 4. The questionnaire for the Ninth Survey consists of a series of questions designed to elicit responses in the form of data, primarily statistical data, on the main components of criminal justice systems for the period The questionnaire for the Ninth Survey closely resembles the questionnaire for the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth United Nations Surveys of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, which covered the period The instructions in the paragraphs below should be carefully studied before the questionnaire is completed. Partial replies should be reviewed by the central responding office to ensure that the jurisdictions to which the data refer (for example, national or federal jurisdictions) are clearly defined and that the data are statistically valid. It is important to review the replies in all parts of the questionnaire for consistency. B. Instructions for completing the questionnaire 1. The questionnaire is compiled in such a way that it can be divided up between different agencies and reassembled in the central responding office before it is returned. 2. Electronic versions of the questionnaire can be found at 3. Respondents completing the tables are requested to keep the following in mind: (a) If figures provided in one table differ significantly from one year to the next, the discrepancy should be explained in notes to the table; (b) If it is not possible to provide data as classified or defined in a table, an attempt should be made to adjust the data as far as possible and to describe the steps involved in notes to the table; (c) If data are not yet available, provisional data or estimates may be inserted and noted accordingly; (d) If a table can be completed only in part, it should be explained in a note in the appropriate section that the rest of the data are not available ; (e) If no data at all are available, the words not yet available, not tabulated or not collected as the case may be, should be written in the appropriate space; (f) In most cases, the calendar year should be used as the reporting period. Where some other annual period is used, such as a fiscal year not corresponding to the calendar year, that fact should be noted; (g) Statistics on such matters as criminal justice personnel, court action and the prison population should include data from all levels of government, that is, from the national, state and local authorities. 4. Requests for any clarification or further information in respect of this questionnaire should be addressed to the Director, Division of Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, P.O. Box 500, A-1400 Vienna, Austria. Such requests can also be sent by fax ( ) or by e- mail 3 Questionnaire for the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, covering the period I. Police Country name: Please complete this section of the questionnaire and return it no later than 15 December 2005 to the coordinating officer, whose name is provided in the box below. The coordinating officer will, in turn, send all sections of the completed questionnaire to the Division of Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, P.O. Box 500, A-1400, Vienna, Austria, or to the Statistics Division, United Nations, New York, N.Y , United States of America. This questionnaire is being distributed through the Permanent Missions to the United Nations. Electronic versions of the questionnaire can be found at Coordinating officer s name: Functional title: Agency: Street: City/state/country: Telephone (including country code and city code): Fax (including country code and city code): 4 Definition of terms 1. The definitions below are applicable to many legal codes. 2. Intentional homicide may be understood to mean death deliberately inflicted on a person by another person, including infanticide. 3. Non-intentional homicide may be understood to mean death not deliberately inflicted on a person by another person. That includes the crime of manslaughter but excludes traffic accidents that result in the death of persons. 4. Assault may be understood to mean physical attack against the body of another person, including battery but excluding indecent assault. Some criminal or penal codes distinguish between aggravated assault and simple assault, depending on the degree of resulting injury. If such a distinction is made in your country, please provide the relevant data for aggravated assault under the category Major assault. Under the category Total assault should be included data on both aggravated assault (i.e. major assault) and simple assault. Please provide the main criterion for distinguishing between aggravated assault and simple assault if such a distinction is made in your country. 5. Rape may be understood to mean sexual intercourse without valid consent. Please indicate whether statutory rape is included in the data provided. If, in your country, a distinction is made between sexual assault and actual penetration, please provide relevant information. 6. Robbery may be understood to mean the theft of property from a person, overcoming resistance by force or threat of force. 7. Theft may be understood to mean the removal of property without the property owner=s consent. Theft excludes burglary and housebreaking as well as theft of a motor vehicle. Some criminal and penal codes distinguish between grand and petty theft, depending on the value of the goods and property taken from their rightful owner. If such a distinction is made in your country, please provide the relevant data for grand theft under the category Major theft. The category Total theft should include data on both grand theft (i.e. major theft) and petty theft. Please provide the main criterion for distinguishing between grand theft and petty theft if such a distinction is made in your country. 8. Automobile theft may be understood to mean the removal of a motor vehicle without the consent of the owner of the vehicle. 9. Burglary may be understood to mean unlawful entry into someone else=s premises with the intention to commit a crime. 10. Fraud may be understood to mean the acquisition of another person=s property by deception. Please indicate whether the fraudulent obtaining of financial property is included in the data provided. 11. Embezzlement may be understood to mean the wrongful appropriation of another person=s property that is already in the possession of the person doing the appropriating. 12. Drug-related crimes may be understood to mean intentional acts that involve the cultivation, production, manufacture, extraction, preparation, offering for sale, distribution, purchase, sale, delivery on any terms whatsoever, brokerage, dispatch, dispatch in transit, transport, importation, exportation and possession of internationally controlled drugs. Where applicable, reference may be made to the provisions of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of and other regulations adopted in pursuance of the provisions of the Convention on Psychotropic Substances of and/or the United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances of Bribery and/or corruption may be understood to mean requesting and/or accepting material or personal benefits, or the promise thereof, in connection with the performance of a public function for 1 United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 520, No Ibid., vol. 1019, No Official Records of the United Nations Conference for the Adoption of a Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, Vienna, 25 November-20 December 1988, vol. I (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.94.XI.5). 5 an action that may or may not be a violation of law and/or promising as well as giving material or personal benefits to a public officer in exchange for a requested favor. 14. Kidnapping may be understood to mean unlawfully detaining a person or persons against their will (or national equivalent e.g. using force, threat, fraud or enticement) for the purpose of demanding for their liberation an illicit gain or any other economic gain or other material benefit, or in order to oblige someone to do or not to do something. 15. Recorded crimes may be understood to mean the number of penal code offences or their equivalent (i.e. various special law offences), but excluding minor road traffic offences and other petty offences, brought to the attention of the police or other law enforcement agencies and recorded by one of those agencies. 16. Police personnel or law enforcement personnel may be understood to mean personnel in public agencies whose principal functions are the prevention, detection and investigation of crime and the apprehension of alleged offenders. If the police are part of the national security force in your country, please try to focus your replies as much as possible on the civil police rather than on the national guard or local militia. If there are many local forces, please provide data on those forces if possible. If police or law enforcement personnel fulfill prosecutorial functions, that fact should be noted in the space below table 1. Data concerning support staff (secretaries, clerks etc.) should be excluded from your replies. 17. If the categories given in paragraphs 2-14 above are not fully compatible with the legal code in your country, please try to adjust the data as far as possible. Alternatively, you may indicate in the space below the table concerned or on the facing page what kinds of crime are included in your statistics that might be comparable to the categories suggested or how the comparable types of crime are defined in your country. 6 Table 1 Police personnel, a by sex, and financial resources, Category 1.1 Total police personnel As at 31 December If some alternative reference date has to be used, please indicate that date here: Females 1.3 Males 1.4 Total police budget/ financial resources (millions of local currency units) b 1.5 Total police personnel assigned to the policing of organized crime 1.6 Currency used Comments Table 1 a Please see the definition of the term police personnel in paragraph 16 on page 6. b Total police budget/financial resources should include all monies allocated to the civil police function at the national level, including salaries and fixed assets. When calculating salaries, please include total monies spent on every individual employed in the given area. When calculating fixed assets, please include all monies invested in non-personnel assets, such as buildings, automobiles and office equipment. 7 Table 2 Crimes recorded in criminal (police) statistics, by type of crime including attempts to commit crimes, Type of crime a Total recorded crimes, regardless of type b 2.2 Intentional homicide: Total Committed 2.3 Total Attempted 2.4 Committed with a firearm 2.5 Non-intentional homicide 2.6 Assault: Major assault 2.7 Total assault 2.8 Rape 2.9 Robbery 2.10 Theft: Major theft 2.11 Total theft 2.12 Automobile theft 2.13 Burglary 2.14 Fraud 2.15 Embezzlement 2.16 Drug-related crime 2.17 Bribery and/or corruption 2.18 Kidnapping Source(s) of the data provided in this table: Comments Table 2 a Please see the definitions of the terms in paragraphs 2-14 on pages 5-6. b Please note that the total number of recorded crimes may be greater than the sum of the numbers given for the individual types of crime listed in the table. The total should not include minor road traffic offences. 8 Table 3 Persons brought into initial formal contact with the police and/or the criminal justice system, by type of crime, where initial formal contact might include being suspected, arrested, cautioned etc., Type of crime a Total persons brought into initial formal contact with the police and/or the criminal justice system, regardless of the type of crime b 3.2 Intentional homicide: Total Committed 3.3 Total Attempted 3.4 Committed with a firearm 3.5 Non-intentional homicide 3.6 Assault: Major assault 3.7 Total assault 3.8 Rape 3.9 Robbery 3.10 Theft: Major theft 3.11 Total theft 3.12 Automobile theft 3.13 Burglary 3.14 Fraud 3.15 Embezzlement 3.16 Drug-related crime 3.17 Bribery and/or corruption 3.18 Kidnapping Source(s) of the data provided in this table: Comments Table 3 a Please see the definition of the terms in paragraphs 2-14 on pages 5-6. b Please note that the total number of persons brought into formal contact with the criminal justice system may be greater than the sum of the numbers given for the individual types of crime listed in the table. 9 Table 4 Persons brought into formal contact with the criminal justice system, by sex and age group, where formal contact might include being suspected, arrested, cautioned etc., Category Females 4.2 Males 4.3 Adults 4.4 Female adults 4.5 Male adults 4.6 Juveniles 4.7 Female juveniles 4.8 Male juveniles Source(s) of the data provided in this table: Please provide the definitions of adult and juvenile that are used in the national criminal justice system: Adult: Juvenile: Comments Table 4 If, in your opinion, there are some additional explanations that might contribute to a better understanding of the data that you have entered in this part of the questionnaire, please provide those explanations in the space below or on an attached sheet. 10 Questionnaire for the Ninth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice Systems, covering the period II. Prosecution Country name: Please complete this section of the questionnaire and return it no later than 15 December 2005 to the coordinating officer, whose name is provided in the box below. The coordinating officer will, in turn, send all sections of the completed questionnaire to the Division of Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, P.O. Box 500, A-1400, Vienna, Austria, or to the Statistics Division, United Nations, New York, N.Y , United States of America. This questionnaire is being distributed through the Permanent Missions to the United Nations. Electronic versions of the questionnaire can be found at Coordinating officer s name: Functional title: Agency: Street: City/state/country: Telephone (including country code and city code): Fax (including country code and city code): 11 Definition of terms 1. The definitions below are applicable to many legal codes. 2. Intentional homicide may be understood to mean death deliberately inflicted on a person by another person, including infanticide. Please indicate whether certain categories of attempted homicide are charged or prosecuted as aggravated assault. 3. Non-intentional homicide may be understood to mean death not deliberately inflicted on a person by another person. That includes the crime of manslaughter but excludes traffic accidents that result in the death of persons. 4. Assault may be understood to mean physical attack against the body of another person, including battery but excluding indecent assault. Some criminal or penal codes distinguish between aggravated assault and simple assault, depending on the degree of resulting injury. If such a distinction is made in your country, please provide the relevant data for aggravated assault under the category Major assault. Under the category Total assault should be included data on both aggravated assault (i.e. major assault) and simple assault. Please provide the main criterion for distinguishing between aggravated assault and simple assault if such a distinction is made in your country. 5. Rape may be understood to mean sexual intercourse without valid consent. Please indicate whether statutory rape is included in the data provided. If, in your country, a distinction is made between sexual assault and actual penetration, please
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