Sleep/Exercise Relationship. Kevin Weston, BS Exercise Physiologist at Intermountain Healthcare LiVe well Center; St. George, Utah

of 19

Please download to get full document.

View again

All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
PDF
19 pages
0 downs
3 views
Share
Description
Sleep/Exercise Relationship Kevin Weston, BS Exercise Physiologist at Intermountain Healthcare LiVe well Center; St. George, Utah Objectives: Explain how chronic sleep deprivation increases obeasity risk
Transcript
Sleep/Exercise Relationship Kevin Weston, BS Exercise Physiologist at Intermountain Healthcare LiVe well Center; St. George, Utah Objectives: Explain how chronic sleep deprivation increases obeasity risk and other weight related morbidities Discuss the functions of physical activity, hormonal and metabolic changes that takes place when sleep duration is compensated Express how exercise can be used to help improve sleep quality and duration Describe why proper sleep habits are vital to weight management and overall health Chronic Sleep Deprivation: Its Relationship to Exercise and Weight Gain Kevin Weston B.S. Exercise Physiologist Kevin Weston B.S. Exercise Science Brigham Young University Certified Exercise Physiologist American College of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer National Academy of Sports Medicine & The Cooper Institute Certified Balance & Mobility Instructor Currently pursuing graduate degree in Applied Exercise Science Married to a beautiful wife and a father to 2 little girls. People live busy, hectic and many times, sleep deprived lives. 2 variables examined: 30 % OF AMERICANS SLEEPING 6 HOURS 34 % OBESITY RATE IN AMERICA From the years Source: CDC Is there an association between sleep duration and weight gain? If so, how many hours are needed to help prevent weight gain and/or obesity? Sleep deprivation and its affect on: Physical activity changes Metabolic changes Hormonal changes Physical Activity Changes Daytime fatigue from poor sleep can affect exercise effectiveness. In addition, exercise can be used as a low cost intervention for mid toolder adults with sleep deprivation or certain disorders. Source: Yang, P., & Ho, K. (2012). Exercise training improves sleep quality in middle aged and older adults with sleep problems: A systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy, 58, Small amounts of routine physical activity can improve sleep Participants who reported getting any exercise at all in the past month were 1/3 less likely to report sleep problems and 1/2 as likely to report daytime tiredness. For older adults with chronic insomnia or individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, a more regimented exercise program may produce benefits for their sleep. Recommendation of aerobic exercise in the morning or a relaxing bedtime routine that includes stretching or yoga. However, exercise alone is unlikely to correct a sleep problem. Source: Grandner MA, Patel NP, Perlis ML, et al. Obesity, diabetes, and exercise associated with sleep related complaints in the American population. Z Gesundh Wiss Oct;19(5): Fitness Sleep Trackers Technology that can help bring sleep awareness to the people. Analysis that 2 different fitness trackers provides This a real client and the actual data that she provided Should you recommend a fitness/sleep tracker? Depends Primary Advantage: Brings awareness of how activity, food intake and quality sleep are vital to overall health success. Primary Disadvantage: People can become too emotionally attached to the tracker data, hindering their progress, rather then helping. (Common to weighing yourself everyday, if trying to lose weight.) Metabolic Changes Concurrent partial sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on: Blood glucose levels Carbohydrate metabolism Overall endocrine function Source: Van Cauter, E., Spiegel, K., Tasali, E., & Leproult, R. (2008). Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss. Sleep Medicine, 9(1), 23 28 Sleep and its relationship to DIABETES A meta analysis of 10 prospective studies showed a stronger association in men and development of diabetes when sleep deprived. Suppression of slow wave sleep (SWS) in young healthy adults w/out reduction of sleep time, resulted in decrease insulin sensitivity and reduced glucose tolerance. 10 year Nurses Health Study showed those who slept 5 hours or less had a significantly higher risk of becoming diabetic. In addition, having diabetes can impair sleep quality. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Poor sleep quality associated with high blood pressure / hypertension prevalence. However, these associations were found in long sleepers as well. More rigorous studies are needed to fully understand this association. Source: Knutson, K. (2010). Sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk: A review of the epidemiologic evidence. Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 24(5), Hormonal Changes Increase in Cortisol (stress hormone) Reduction in Growth Hormone (GH) Decrease in Leptin (satiety promoting hormone) Increase in Ghrelin (appetite promoting hormone) Source: Markwald, R. R., Melanson, E. L., Smith, M. R., Higgins, J., Perreault, L., Eckel, R. H., & Wright, K. P. (2013). Impact of insufficient sleep on total daily energy expenditure, food intake, and weight gain. Hormone Release is modulated by sleep Both GH and cortisol hormones have important roles in glucose metabolism, but are adversely affected by acute and chronic sleep deprivation. Evidence seems to indicate that dysfunction of glucose metabolism and obesity risk are likely outcomes of changes in metabolic hormone release from chronic sleep deprivation. Source: Van Cauter, E., Spiegel, K., Tasali, E., & Leproult, R. (2008). Metabolic consequences of sleep and sleep loss. Sleep Medicine, 9(1), 23 28 Other take home messages Short sleep duration is associated with increase prevalence of obesity in adults and children. In fact, associations between sleep and BMI/obesity appear stronger at younger ages. Short sleep ( 6 h) and long ( 9 h) duration is associated with increase risk of diabetes and hypertension in adults. Knutson, K. (2010). Sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk: A review of the epidemiologic evidence. Best Practice & Research Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 24(5), In conclusion There appears to be association between: Chronic sleep deprivation & weight management Although there is much to be studied and examined, consistently sleeping less than 6 hours a night seems to have negative effects on multiple systems in the body, many of which appear to escalate the risk of increased body weight. Recommendation: To help manage your weight: Avoid sleeping less than 6 hours for multiple days a week. Try to get at least 7, ideally 8 hours of sleep each night for most adults.
Related Search
Advertisements
Similar documents
View more...
Advertisements
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks