Son Connect Serv Let | Debits And Credits | Credit Card

of 4

Please download to get full document.

View again

All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
PDF
4 pages
0 downs
5 views
Share
Description
The story of legendary American journalist William L. Shirer and how his first-hand reporting on the rise of the Nazis and on World War II brought the devastation alive for millions of Americans. When William L. Shirer started up the Berlin bureau of Edward R. Murrow’s CBS News in the 1930s, he quickly became the most trusted reporter in all of Europe. Shirer hit the streets to talk to both the everyman and the disenfranchised, yet he gained the trust of the Nazi elite and through these contacts obtained a unique perspective of the party’s rise to power. Unlike some of his esteemed colleagues, he did not fall for Nazi propaganda and warned early of the consequences if the Third Reich was not stopped. When the Germans swept into Austria in 1938 Shirer was the only American reporter in Vienna, and he broadcast an eyewitness account of the annexation. In 1940 he was embedded with the invading German army as it stormed into France and occupied Paris. The Nazis insisted that the armistice be reported through their channels, yet Shirer managed to circumvent the German censors and again provided the only live eyewitness account. His notoriety grew inside the Gestapo, who began to build a charge of espionage against him. His life at risk, Shirer had to escape from Berlin early in the war. When he returned in 1946 to cover the Nuremberg trials, Shirer had seen the full arc of the Nazi menace. It was that experience that inspired him to write The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich—the magisterial, definitive history of the most brutal ten years the modern world had known—which has sold millions of copies and has become a classic. Drawing on never-before-seen journals and letters from Shirer’s time in Germany, award-winning reporter Steve Wick brings to life the maverick journalist as he watched history unfold and first shared it with the world.
Tags
Transcript
  „ The Long Night ‟ -William L. Shirer And The Rise And Fall of the Third Reich ‟  by Steve Wick   Hardcover: 288 pages   Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (August 2, 2011)   Language: English   ISBN-10: 0230623182   ISBN-13: 978-0230623187 Pre Order:   http://amzn.to/nVYctl  „ SAMPLE CHAPTER-SNEAK PREVIEW ‟   1Prologue  Leaving Berlin BerlinDecember 5, 1940Snow had fallen all night, and as morning broke over the metropolis Bill Shirer set out ina taxi from the Adlon Hotel for the airport at Tempelhof. He felt as if he ’ d been runningnonstop for days or weeks or years. On top of the fatigue he ’ d had too many whiskeysthe previous nights as he planned his getaway, and this morning his stomach churned.The alarm that had overcome him in previous weeks grew more intense as the cabnegotiated the snowy streets.The final mile to the airport stretched on and on until finally there it was, dark buildingsset against an overcast sky. Each night Berlin became a vast city of dark streets anddark buildings trying desperately to hide itself from British bombers, the morning sunrevealing all its secrets. Shirer was sick of being in a blacked-out city, sick of thedarkness and the fear and the inability to live any kind of a happy life. He missed brightnights listening to great music. He loathed the government censors and the bureaucratsand the journalists who played along with them. On top of everything he missed Tessand their two-year-old daughter.   ●●●   A suspenseful recasting of the same period covered in Berlin Diary, using thepublished diary but more importantly the srcinal handwritten pages Shirersmuggled out of Berlin . . . Wick has used his resources scrupulously andilluminates, more than does the 1941 book, the heavy personal toll thatremaining in Berlin took on Shirer and his family. -- Columbia Journalism Review  A gripping account of a courageous journalist's efforts to alert the world toHitler's plan, and an engaging discussion of the relationship between journalismand personal integrity, which is as relevant today as it was then. -- Kirkus Reviews Wick offers an absorbing and very detailed account, the perfectcompanion piece to Shirer's masterwork. - - Publishers Weekly    ●●●    -2-He had not expected the weather to turn bad. It only heightened his worry. Three bigpassenger planes had crashed in previous days because of icing problems. If the stormworsened the plane would not take off and the airport would be shut down. He ’ d have totry again another day. Every day brought unexpected risks. If the plane did take off inthe storm, he feared the wings would ice up and the pilot would have to drop lower overthe mountains, and anything could happen then. His friend Wally Deuel had left Berlinthe day before, in a panic after the three crashes, taking a train to Stuttgart where hehoped to find a safe flight out of the country.Shirer decided to try his luck at Tempelhof after a friend in the Propaganda Ministry hadwarned him that he might be arrested as a spy. He feared she was right. But he didn ’ tknow. There was no way to pin anything down and to know what was rumor and whatwas fact, or to know who was lying and who was telling the truth. Maybe she wassetting him up for arrest at the airport just as he walked across the tarmac to the stairsleading up to the plane.On top of all the worry about the flight ’ s being able to depart, he was concerned aboutthe bombings. Some nights coming from the broadcast center he ’ d hear the alarmssound and he ’ d run headlong into a building where he knew there was a shelter, the airwardens waving their arms frantically and blowing their whistles to get everyone off thestreets. From below ground he could hear the bombs striking their targets  – deep,heavy thumps, followed by bigger explosions as the attack moved closer to the citycenter, like the thunder of an approaching summer storm that rolled across the plains ofeastern Iowa near his childhood home. Tornadoes tore up isolated farmhouses and oldhay barns and Shirer would read about the damage in the Cedar Rapids newspaperand imagine what it must have been like to live through it.On nights the British struck Berlin, the alarms sounded and panic set in as people stilloutside at night ran for safety. The noise of the bombers sounded like racinglocomotives passing overhead. Suddenly the antiaircraft guns exploded and fires lit upthe night sky. He ’ d heard of parts of wings, tail sections, and whole engines being foundin fields and on city streets, which some mornings were littered with thousands of piecesof shrapnel. With the bombings of the city and surrounding areas there were noguarantees he could get to the airport at all if he did not get out this morning. In spite ofthe bombings the government went about its business as usual. Uniformed Germanssat happily in restaurants and cafes in Paris. They visited nightclubs and museums,spending their marks like happy tourists. Shirer had arrived in Paris hours after theFrench collapse and walked the empty streets and stood with other correspondents inhotel lobbies, empty except for smiling German army officers, while columns of Frenchrefugees poured south. He found it all too incredible.Hitler in Paris!   -3-He was relieved when he reached the airport terminal, but profoundly worried about thetrunks in which he had packed all his personal papers. So much of himself was in them.The letters he had received, all the letters to others he ’ d carboned and saved in his files,nearly a decade of his diaries, his clippings, practically everything he ’ d put on papergoing back years  – all packed into trunks customs officials were sure to search beforehe could board the airplane.Over the previous few days, knowing he would attempt to leave this morning, he hadgone through his papers and diary entries and burned the ones he thought could hurthim or others. Sensitive papers he did not want to burn he gave to friends who workedin different embassies in Berlin, telling them to smuggle them out of the country inofficial pouches and he would get them later. He packed his remaining papers at thebottom of two trunks, and put routine papers and copies of his radio broadcasts on topof them, hoping anyone who searched the trunks would see there was nothing to beconcerned about and not go any deeper. Then he had taken the trunks to Gestapoheadquarters on the Alexanderplatz, told them he was leaving the country, and hadthem put their official exit stamps on them. With this he hoped to thwart customsofficials from doing their own searches at the airport.The terminal was crowded in spite of the snow. Anxious men in suits and ties andovercoats stood in tight clusters with women in their best dresses, shoes and hats.Young children huddled next to their parents. They were getting out now when theyshould have left years earlier. But they were getting out, finally. No more excuses. Nomore thinking, It will get better. It has to get better. Hitler can  ’  t last. All they wanted wasfor the plane to be cleared for takeoff and to feel it mercifully lift off the ground, to flysouth until it cleared German airspace  – away from the Fatherland. Seeing these menand women reminded him of the night in March 1938 when he went to the airport inVienna to buy a ticket to London and could not find an empty seat on any flight. He ’ dgone person to person in a crowd of panicked Austrians, offering money to anyone whowould sell him a seat. None had taken him up, so desperate were they to get out. Whenhe finally found a plane that would take him to London  – via Prague, Dresden and Berlin  – he kicked himself for trying to talk someone out of leaving. Had a man or a womanstayed back because of him  – what would have come of it?Shirer ’ s plane, a thirty-two seat Junkers owned by Lufthansa, sat on the tarmac justoutside the terminal. If there were no problems with his trunks and if the weathercooperated, he would board the plane for Spain. His great hope was to be in Americabefore Christmas and to be reunited with Tess and their daughter. Once in Spain, ifeverything fell into place, he ’ d board another flight for Lisbon. There, he hoped EdMurrow would be waiting for him.  -4-He could picture Murrow sitting in the airport bar, wearing a suit and tie, smoking onecigarette after the other, listening to the radio, following the German bombing of London.And wondering, as Shirer also wondered as he waited in Tempelhof for the snow to letup and the plane to be cleared for takeoff, what the world would look like when the warfinally ended and Hitler was triumphant. Follow Steve Wick on Facebook: http://Facebook.com/Steve.Wick  Follow Steve Wick on Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Steve_Wick  About: “ The Long Night ”   The story of legendary American journalist William L. Shirer and how his first-handreporting on the rise of the Nazis and on World War II brought the devastation alive formillions of Americans. When William L. Shirer started up the Berlin bureau of Edward R. Murrow’s CBS News in the 1930s, he quickly became the most trusted reporter in all of  Europe. Shirer hit the streets to talk to both the everyman and the disenfranchised, yethe gained the trust of the Nazi elite and through these contacts obtained a unique perspective of the party’s rise to power.  Unlike some of his esteemed colleagues, he did not fall for Nazi propaganda andwarned early of the consequences if the Third Reich was not stopped. When theGermans swept into Austria in 1938 Shirer was the only American reporter in Vienna,and he broadcast an eyewitness account of the annexation. In 1940 he was embeddedwith the invading German army as it stormed into France and occupied Paris. The Nazisinsisted that the armistice be reported through their channels, yet Shirer managed tocircumvent the German censors and again provided the only live eyewitness account.His notoriety grew inside the Gestapo, who began to build a charge of espionageagainst him. His life at risk, Shirer had to escape from Berlin early in the war. When hereturned in 1946 to cover the Nuremberg trials, Shirer had seen the full arc of the Nazimenace. It was that experience that inspired him to write The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich  — the magisterial, definitive history of the most brutal ten years the modern worldhad known — which has sold millions of copies and has become a classic.Drawing on never-before- seen journals and letters from Shirer’s time in Germany, award-winning reporter Steve Wick brings to life the maverick journalist as he watchedhistory unfold and first shared it with the world. Order a copy of THE LONG NIGHT now:  http://amzn.to/nVYctl   -###-
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks