ZBGs-Getting_started_with_Sculptris.pdf

of 10

Please download to get full document.

View again

All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
PDF
10 pages
1 downs
10 views
Share
Description
guide to getting started with Sculptris: The sculpting freedom! By Pablo Munoz Gomez About this guide This quick guide will give you the information you need to get started with Sculptris. In it, I will go over various steps from: installation; to sculpting a simple Dragon head; I will describe the brushes and the tools that will help you shape your own ideas. I also mention key concepts which are in line with similar actions in ZBrush to help with your transition to the “big leagues”. I hope t
Tags
Transcript
  1 guide to getting started with Sculptris: The sculpting freedom! By Pablo Munoz Gomez    About this guide This quick guide will give you the information you need to get started with Sculptris. In it, I will go over various steps from: installation; to sculpting a simple Dragon head; I will describe the brushes and the tools that will help you shape your own ideas. I also mention key concepts which are in line with similar actions in ZBrush to help with your transition to the “big leagues”.I hope that this will be helpful and don’t forget to get the Sculptris Cheat Sheet for a quick reference.    2 guide to getting started with Sculptris: The sculpting freedom! By Pablo Munoz Gomez intro to The sculpting freedom Sculptris is a fantastic little application for 3D sculpting. It has a very clean user interface, powerful features and tools, is easy to get used to it and it’s FREE. In my opinion, this is the best way to get started in 3D sculpting. Sculptris is also the perfect introduction to ZBrush, it will present you with key concepts and a variety of operations that overlap with the way ZBrush work.Zbrush is a fully featured software and might be overwhelming for new users, but Sculptris can be the bridge for artists that want to learn 3D sculpting. I see it as a great introduction to the Dynamesh feature in ZBrush; a great way to explore shapes and concepts.  Why this guide? I thought I should do a bit of an introduction to Sculptris to give you guys another way to get started. The following guide will give you the information you need to start sculpting and I will also try to mention concepts that are similar in ZBrush when appropriate, hoping that when you get to ZBrush, you’ll be more familiar with the tools.  What to expect? This is an simple guide that will show you bit by bit most of the features available within Sculptris (focusing on sculpting). I won’t create anything in particular (except in the quick “hands on” guide at the end) but I will try to explain all the brushes as well as their settings, with visual examples, to give you the basics of this software so that you can then take it further and create anything you want with it. Let’s get on with it…To get sculptris, head to the pixologic website, and click on the “free download” button. http://pixologic.com/sculptris/You’ll get a pop-up dialog to choose between Mac and Windows. After you choose your operative system, you just need to enter your name, last name and email to get Sculptris. I will recommend you tick the newsletter boxes for Sculptris and ZClassroom!Then install and start the program. You’ll see straight away the simplicity of it, as you are presented with a sphere and a few controls at the top. This guide is structured with some simple sections to make it easier for you to follow, the first part will be about the interface, the second part will discuss navigation and shortcuts, the third and final part will explore the tools, brushes and their settings. User Interface I’m sure you’ll figure out most things within a second of using Sculptris but I’ll mention all the UI elements anyway. Canvas The whole screen is your canvas and as you can see the tools are “floating” over it. Tools The tools and brushes are organized in a grid of buttons at the top left corner. Options To the right of the tool icons you have the options that control each tool / brush. Material and Paint Further to the right you have the option to change material and a big button to swap to paint mode (we will explore painting in another guide, for now we’ll only be focusing on sculpting). Mesh / 3D object The sphere in the middle is obviously your mesh that you can edit. Resolution At the bottom left the number of triangles (resolution of the mesh) is displayed. View At the bottom centre of the screen you’ll see an indication of what view you are in.  Navigation and shortcuts I have put together a one page  Sculptris Cheat Sheet with most shortcuts (brushes and tools also) that you can print and stick on a wall as a quick reference. This cheat sheet comes with this guide as a separate PDF but you can also download it from the ZBGs Resource page.The 3 basics of navigation are Rotate (Orbit), Pan and Zoom. ZBrush uses the same controls so you don’t have to learn another set of commands when you get to ZBrush. You can actually switch back to the old way to navigate in Sculptris but I’d recommend to stick to the ZBrush style (the default). Rotate: Click anywhere on the canvas and drag to rotate the model (you can use left, middle or right click).    3 guide to getting started with Sculptris: The sculpting freedom! By Pablo Munoz Gomez Zoom: At first, zooming in and out might feel awkward, but once you get used to it, you’ll see the benefits of it. To zoom in and out press Alt then click anywhere on the canvas, without releasing the click let go of Alt and simply drag up or down to zoom. Move:  to move, just hold Alt and click anywhere on the canvasWhile rotating, you can hold Shift or press “Z” to snap the object to the nearest view (top, right, left, etc.). To hide the model or a portion of it, you can hold Shift + Ctrl + Left Click and drag. This command will show a rectangular selection with a green border and whatever is outside that border will be temporarily hidden. If you want to hide what is inside of the rectangular shape  instead, you can add Alt to the shortcut: Shift + Ctrl + Alt + Left Click and drag. When you do that, the border or the rectangular selection will change to red.You can also hold “H” and Left Click the object to hide the whole model. Also holding “H” will bring the selection to hide areas of the model. Another cool option is to invert the selection area. Once you hide an area, you can Shift + Ctrl + Left Click and drag on the canvas and invert the selection.To make everything visible again , you can Shift + Ctrl and Left Click on the canvas and press Ctrl + H. Finally, as I mentioned before, the Canvas is the whole screen. To make this more evident, press “Tab”  to hide the UI and you will be sculpting distraction free (printing the cheat sheet would be handy here). Brushes and their settings In Sculptris we have a grid of 9 brushes  that can be tweaked individually to create numerous effects, but in general these brushes should be all you need to sculpt whatever you want. Each brush has a shortcut but there are also shortcuts to access the settings of each brush to change their behaviour.Let’s start with the basics: each brush has a set of options,  some of the options are always there for all brushes and some of the functions are unique to the brush you choose. For the sake of this guide, I’ll call these Generic settings (for all brushes) and Specific Settings  (for each brush). Take the Draw [D] brush for example, you’ll get the settings on the right of the brush icon, the area I highlighted with RED is where the Generic settings are, so you will see them for all brushes, and the area highlighted in BLUE is where the Specific settings are, so these settings are unique to the brush you have selected. Generic Settings The most used settings while sculpting are the Size, Strength and Details slider, which can be quickly accessed with Spacebar: There is another way to change the size and strength  that will significantly speed up your workflow: Hold Spacebar  and click and drag horizontally  to change the strength:Or vertically, to change the size  of the brush.Then you have [Lazy] , [Airbrush]  and [invert].  These are setting that are quite similar in ZBrush: Lazy would be “lazy mouse”, Airbrush is determined by the stroke type and inverts is equivalent to pressing “Alt” while sculpting.    4 guide to getting started with Sculptris: The sculpting freedom! By Pablo Munoz Gomez How useful are these settings? Well, the Lazy and Airbrush settings modify the brush in two different ways. The Lazy option  is great when creating smooth and controlled lines. You’ll notice that there is a delay between the mouse pointer and the actual effect of the brush. Airbrush, in my opinion is a matter of personal taste. I prefer to turn it off and may only use it towards the end when adding details. Its effect is very straightforward. Imagine you are holding a spray-paint can, if you move it slowly while painting you should get a smooth line, if you move it faster then you’ll start to get some gaps. Finally, there are 3 extra shortcuts that you can use at any time with most brushes. Using the Draw brush  for example, you can: Hold Shift while sculpting to smooth the model.Hold Alt while sculpting  to invert the effect of the brush (also pressing “X”). Hold Ctrl  while sculpting to mask areas of the model. That’s it for this section, now that you now the basic settings for all brushes I will go through the each individual brush and briefly describe their Specific settings. Before I start with the brushes, I will just mention how to reset everything if you want to start fresh again or how to add new object.The New sphere and New plane  will do just that: add a new sphere or plane, when you click on the icons, you’ll get a pop-up message with some options.If you select NEW SCENE  you’ll basically reset all and get a new fresh sphere, but if you choose ADD OBJECT,  you’ll get a wireframe of a sphere and the ability to position it wherever you want. This is useful it you want to add eyes on a character as separate objects. Draw brush – shortcut [D] This is essentially the ZBrush Standard brush, but it also could be the Clay brush. This is where the specific settings start to make an impact on the behaviour of the brush. With the Draw brush selected you’ll see an option called “Clay” in the specific setting area. When this is off, you’ll get the ZBrush standard brush behaviour, when “Clay” is pressed, the brush will change to behave like the clay brush. Draw – Clay off: This is great to define shapes; it can also be used to detail models and add things like wrinkles and folding skin. Draw – Clay On: This option is perfect to build up volumes, it adds a layering effect that helps you alter shapes gradually. Be careful because this brush will fill the area you are working on so you may loose details (I’ll use it at the beginning of the sculpting process and then move to Draw – Clay off). Flatten Brush – Shortcut [F] The flatten brush is really cool and very helpful. It could be used in a variety of ways, on hard surfaces for example. This is the effect of the flatten brush over a “fresh” new sphere:As you can see there are a bunch of flat areas (planes), that could be a great starting point for a rock model for instance. What if you want a bit more of control over the areas you are flattening? Well, the specific settings of this brush allows you to control the angle of the flat area in a couple of ways: Lock Angle [F]: When this option is on, the angle of the area that is going to be flatten, will lock to the angle of the first stroke. This allows you to produce
Related Search
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks